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Henry Treece

THE POSTMAN DELIVERS … Getting Carter

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GC backI’ve been waiting for this one! Just published by No Exit Press is a new study of the doomed genius, Ted Lewis. Written by Nick Triplow, it carries the blurb:

“A perceptive and detailed study of one of the most
important writers you’ve never heard of.”

 While that may be true of younger or more casual crime fiction fans, it is certainly not the case with old sweats such as myself. Like thousands more, I was drawn to Ted Lewis by the iconic 1971 film adaption of of his most famous novel, which was first published in 1970 with the title Jack’s Return Home.

Nick Triplow is himself a noir novelist, but thankfully has not followed Lewis in his lifestyle Triplowchoices. Lewis suffered a downward spiral involving alcoholism and family breakdown. He died in 1982, just forty two years old. Triplow (right) has emulated his subject in one regard, however, as he now lives in Barton on Humber, where Lewis went to school. Ted Lewis’s first mentor was an English teacher called Henry Treece, about whom you can read a little more in this short feature. 

A full review of Getting Carter will be posted soon, and it will be flagged up on the Fully Booked Twitter page.  The book is now available both in hardback and as a Kindle.

 

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THE POET AND THE NOIR NOVELIST

Henry Treece was a poet, and a writer of historical fiction for children. In 1939 he took the job of teacher of English at Barton-upon-Humber Grammar School. When war came, he joined the RAF as an intelligence officer, and was well acquainted with the many air bases in Lincolnshire. This poem dates from that time.

Lincolnshire Bomber Station

All well and good, you may say, but what has this to do with crime fiction? The connection is that one of the pupils at the Grammar School was a boy called Ted Lewis. Throughout his time at the school he had excelled in art and English, and when he left, it was his ambition to go on to art school. His parents were against the idea, and it was only the intervention of Henry Treece on Ted’s behalf that persuaded them to allow him to go.

Lewis’s first novel, All The Way Home and All The Night Through, was published in 1969, but it was the 1971 novel Jack’s Return Home, later filmed as Get Carter, which was to make Lewis one of the immortals of crime fiction writing. Below, Treece and Lewis, both busy at their typewriters.

Treece Lewis

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